Tag: African religions

GMC: Orisha Osumare

The third God for September is also the second Orisha we’ve had, Osumare. Osumare (pronounced O-SHU-mar-RAY) is also spelled Ochumare, Oshumare, or Oxumaré. An alternate name is Ketu. Especially when using the name Ketu, Osumare is connected to the spirits of the dead, the ancestors, called the eggun (pronounced E-goo-N). Osumare is the Yoruba Orisha of…

GMC: Oya

Oya is the West African Yoruba Orisha of winds, storms, fire, and transformation. She is also believed to be the Goddess of the Niger River in Africa, and the Amazon River in Brazil, where the worship of the Orishas was transplanted to the Americas along with the slave trade. Several of the sites I looked…

GMC Poetry: Oya

Ebony skin glistens Stretched taut over hard muscle An arm raises above a dreadlocked head Sunlight glints across the razor-sharp machete edge Thick lips pull back in a sharp grin Just as razor-sharp as the weapon A bloodcurdling cry bursts forth from deep in the throat As the machete drops with deadly accuracy. Eyes black as…

April GMC

The Gods of the Month for April are Khnum, Hathor, and Oya, a Yoruba Orisha. Two Egyptian Gods came up in the same month again, which is interesting. I guess the Gods think I need to spend more time on the Kemetic side of my spirituality instead of just the Greek. Should be another interesting…

Intresting Links

 The world’s first Temple? New Attacks on African Spirituality the Capitoline Venus is on loan for the first time ever Pagan Chaplin Patrick McCollum on why his fight against the California prison system’s “five faiths” policy matters 71 new Ovid manuscripts discovered

Link round-up

In the same vein as my post on the Kalasha, another tribal people is seeking to preserve their culture.  Prominent Yoruba teachers in Nigeria are bemoaning the erosion of their cultural traditions . At his recent book launch  Chief Mathew Ogedengbe warned that “we have allowed foreign languages, cultures and traditions to rule us.” Why…